Why morning workouts might be your best workouts

Why morning workouts might be your best workouts

The best time to work out is whenever it’s best for you and your schedule. However having said that, there are a lot great reasons – with some science to back it up – for working out in the morning. Here are five important reasons why you should work out in the morning.

Morning workouts tend to become a healthy habit. 

Speaking from experience (and there’s data to back it up), if you add working out as part of your regular morning routine, you’re more likely to do it and be consistent with it. Distractions to stop you from exercise are far less likely than if you wait until the end of the day when you might be tired, running late at work, or headed to a social activity. Our advice? Set out your workout clothes the night before, put them on first thing in the morning as soon as you get out of bed, and get going!

You’ll consume fewer unnecessary calories. 

A study published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that morning exercise might make food less appealing to you. The Brigham Young University researchers showed images of food to two groups of women: those who exercised in the morning and those who did not. The morning exercisers (45 minutes morning workouts) were less interested in images of food than women who skipped the workout. Those who worked out in the morning also did not consume more food than the other group throughout the day.  

Pre-breakfast workouts can be beneficial for burning fat and sugar. 

There’s plenty of studies to indicate that you not only burn more fat with a morning workout, especially if you do it before eating, but it’s also good for your sugar levels. In one study out of Belgium, three groups of young men were studied. The sedentary group gained weight, developed insulin resistance, and added new fat cells. The men who exercised after breakfast gained about three pounds each and developed insulin problems. However, the men who worked out in the morning before eating gained almost no weight and retained healthy insulin levels. They also burned more fat throughout the day than the other men. A 2013 British Journal of Nutrition study found exercising on an empty stomach can burn as much as 20 percent more fat than when a meal is eaten first. (Keep in mind that some people get lightheaded if they don’t eat before working out. In that case, have a light breakfast, wait a while, then exercise.)  

You’ll sleep better at night. 

Having trouble sleeping? Stop exercising at night. Evidence shows evening exercise is more likely to keep you up at night.  The National Sleep Foundation says those who work out early in the morning experience deeper sleep cycles and “spend 75 percent more time in the most reparative stages of slumber than those who exercise at later times that day.” So, what are you waiting for? Lay out tomorrow morning’s workout clothes tonight!

It’s good for your blood pressure.

If you want to lower your blood pressure, do morning workouts for at least 30 minutes a day and add breaks in sitting all day. A study by the Baker Heart Institute in Australia in collaboration with the journal Hypertension (published February 2019) found that a morning workout supplemented by breaks in sitting throughout the day lowered blood pressure. The study found that morning exercise lowered the blood pressure for “a good portion of the day among older adults who are obese or overweight, especially women”. A half an hour of moderate-intensity walking in the morning reduced the average 8-hour blood pressure by 3.4/0.8 mm Hg.

One last bit of morning encouragement: Bringham Young University researchers found that people who work out in the morning end up being more active in general. And as we’ve said, you’re more likely to make exercise a habit if you do it in the morning, but any time you can get in a workout is the best time – whether that’s first thing in the morning, afternoon, or evening. The most important thing you can do is find a time to exercise, write it into your schedule, and watch it turn into a habit. 

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Why Peanut Butter Is Good For You

Why Peanut Butter Is Good For You

Peanut butter

One of the world’s most popular spreads!

  • It tastes delicious
  • It sticks to the roof of your mouth before it melts and tastes wonderful.
  • Can eat it with lots of other foods

What Is Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter is mostly unprocessed food.

It’s basically just peanuts, often roasted, that are ground into a paste.

However, this doesn’t apply to many commercial brands of peanut butter that contain various added ingredients, such as sugar, vegetable oils, and even trans fat.

Eating too much added sugar and trans fat has been linked to various health problems, such as heart disease. Make sure and pick the brands that one ingredient….peanuts.

Rather than buying junk food, choose real peanut butter. It should contain nothing but peanuts and maybe a bit of salt.

For all purposes, the health effects of regular peanuts should be almost identical to those of peanut butter since it’s essentially just ground peanuts.

Peanut butter is not for everyone. If you are allergic there are a lot of nut butter alternatives.

  • Almond butter
  • Cashew butter
  • Sunflower butter
  • Pecan butter
  • Pistachio butter
  • Hazelnut butter

 

It’s a Good Protein Source

Peanut butter is a fairly balanced energy source that supplies all of the three macronutrients. A 100g portion of peanut butter contains:

  • Carbohydrate: 20 grams of carbs (13% of calories), 6 of which are fiber.
  • Protein: 25 grams of protein (15% of calories), which is quite a lot compared to most other plant foods.
  • Fat: 50 grams of fat, totaling about 72% of calories.

Even though peanut butter is fairly protein rich, it’s low in the essential amino acid methionine.

Peanuts belong to the legume family, which also includes beans, peas, and lentils. Legume protein is much lower in methionine and cysteine compared to animal protein.

Peanut butter is comprised of about 25% protein, making it an excellent plant-based protein source. However, it is low in the essential amino acid methionine.

Low in Carbs

Pure peanut butter contains only 20% carbs, making it suitable for a low-carb diet.

It also causes a very low rise in blood sugar and is a perfect option for people with type 2 diabetes. Peanuts are low in carbs and suitable for people with type 2 diabetes or those following a low-carb diet.

High in Healthy Fats

Since peanut butter is very high in fat, a 100-gram portion contains a hefty dose of 588 calories.

Despite their high-calorie content, eating moderate amounts of pure peanut butter or whole peanuts is perfectly fine on a weight-loss diet.

Half of the fat in peanut butter is made up of oleic acid, a healthy type of monounsaturated fat also found in high amounts in olive oil.

Oleic acid has been linked to several health benefits, such as improved insulin sensitivity.

Pure peanut butter is a good source of healthy fats. While some people have been worried about its omega-6 linoleic acid content, limited evidence justifies their concerns.

Peanut Butter Is Fairly Rich in Vitamins and Minerals

Peanut butter is fairly nutritious. A 100-gram portion of peanut butter provides many vitamins and minerals:

  • Vitamin E: 45% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B3 (Niacin): 67% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B6: 27% of the RDA
  • Folate: 18% of the RDA
  • Magnesium: 39% of the RDA
  • Copper: 24% of the RDA
  • Manganese: 73% of the RDA

It is also high in biotin and contains decent amounts of vitamin B5, iron, potassium, zinc and selenium.

It’s Rich in Antioxidants

Like most real foods, peanut butter contains more than just the basic vitamins and minerals. It also contains plenty of other biologically active nutrients, which can have some health benefits.

Peanut butter is rich in antioxidants, including p-coumarin and resveratrol. These plant compounds have been linked to various health benefits in animals.

 

7 different ways to eat peanut butter

  1. Peanut butter and bananas
  2. Peanut butter and apples
  3. Ant on a log (celery)
  4. Peanut butter stir fry
  5. Peanut butter and yogurt
  6. Peanut butter on a granola bar
  7. Peanut butter with a SPOON

Personal Trainer | Fitness Guru
www.kellyfennelly.com

about

Kelly Fennelly

I have been a professional in the fitness industry for more than 20 years. A native of the PNW, I have lived in Seattle for 16+ years. I spend most of my time designing and implementing Wellness Programs for clients. Along with my passion for Wellness & Fitness, I have a passion for supporting local non-profits and contributing to our community. 7 years ago I started a not for profit charity called Little Black Dress Party and hold annual fundraising events for local nonprofits focused on women, children, and families.

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Benefits of Having Strong Buns (aka Glutes)

Benefits of Having Strong Buns (aka Glutes)

Your gluteal muscles are the largest and most important group of muscles in your body. Besides looking good in jeans, it’s because they consist of three muscles that work together to rotate, abduct and extend the hip making them essential to everyday movements. By strengthening these muscles (the gluteus minimus, medius, and maximus) your posture, performance and overall strength will improve drastically.

Advantages of having strong glutes are:

Better posture
With most of us having to spend the majority of our days with our buns glued to a chair, we are at high risk of contracting the “sitting disease”. Too much sitting can actually lead to organ damage, muscle atrophy, and injured backs. When strengthening your glute muscles, you’ll have a strong spin and which will improve your posture.

Improved athletic performance
Besides looking incredible in jeans…your buns can generate a significant amount of power. Strengthening your gluteus maximus can lead to improved speed, acceleration, and explosive power. It’s simple, athletes with strong glutes and hip complex are stronger and faster than those with weak glutes.

Reduced chance of injury
Not only are strong glutes essential to athletic performance but they also play a vital role in reducing your chance of injury, like a fall. Having strong glute muscles can prevent serious injuries to your knees, lower back, and hamstrings, all of which are essential to simple daily activities. Weak glute muscles can also cause poor lower back alignment which can lead to some serious injuries including sprains and tears in your back muscles.

Below are some exercises that can help strengthen your fine buns!!

  • Squats
  • Lunges
  • Quadruped hip extensions
  • Single leg bridge
  • Walking sideways with a resistance band around your ankles

Personal Trainer | Fitness Guru
www.kellyfennelly.com

about

Kelly Fennelly

I have been a professional in the fitness industry for more than 20 years. A native of the PNW, I have lived in Seattle for 16+ years. I spend most of my time designing and implementing Wellness Programs for clients. Along with my passion for Wellness & Fitness, I have a passion for supporting local non-profits and contributing to our community. 7 years ago I started a not for profit charity called Little Black Dress Party and hold annual fundraising events for local nonprofits focused on women, children, and families.

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Why Glutes Matter!

Why Glutes Matter!

What?
The Gluteal muscles are crucial for daily function (i.e. standing from a seated position) Glutes stabilize the pelvis and keep integrity of movement in the hip joint.
Gluteus Minimus: Abducts & Rotates Hip (helps with hip extension)
Gluteus Medius: Abducts & Rotates Hip
Gluteus Maximus: Extends & laterally rotates hip joint (helps with abduction & adduction of hip)

Where?

Why?
We like to give attention to all 3 muscles of the glutes however like to feature the gluteus medius as a STAR. The gluteus medius works with other muscles on the side of the hip to assist with pulling your thigh out to the side (called hip abduction). Having strong gluteal muscles is important for walking, balance. If weak or not activating they place burden on your low back and hip flex.

3 Key Exercises

Personal Trainer | Fitness Guru
www.kellyfennelly.com

about

Kelly Fennelly

I have been a professional in the fitness industry for more than 20 years. A native of the PNW, I have lived in Seattle for 16+ years. I spend most of my time designing and implementing Wellness Programs for clients. Along with my passion for Wellness & Fitness, I have a passion for supporting local non-profits and contributing to our community. 7 years ago I started a not for profit charity called Little Black Dress Party and hold annual fundraising events for local nonprofits focused on women, children, and families.

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Myth vs. Fact Top 10 Water Myth Busters

Myth vs. Fact Top 10 Water Myth Busters

1) Coffee, tea and soft drink are sufficient sources of liquid

Coffee, tea and all those different kinds of soft drink are no substitute for lots of lovely pure water. While there’s an ongoing debate about whether or not caffeine causes dehydration and makes you pee a lot (it’s different for everyone), you shouldn’t really drink around two – three liters of these kind of drinks a day! Especially if they’re full of sugar or sweetener as well. (2-3 liters is roughly how much fluid we’re recommended to consume, depending on a bunch of different factors.

2) Drinking water makes me bloated

Drinking a lot of water very quickly might just temporarily bloat your tummy, so listen to your body and slow down a bit. You might also have other stuff going on in your stomach (hang on – are you still digesting food!?) Good old fashioned common sense should prevail – just don’t drink so much so fast. If you have real persistent bloating issues it could be something else like a tummy bug or constipation so best chat to your friendly, knowledgeable doctor about it.

3) I shouldn’t drink water while eating – it’s not healthy

False! Drinking (in moderation) while eating will balance your food intake and will actually improve food digestion. This is why your doctor will always recommend drinking before and during meals.

4) I shouldn’t drink water in the morning

No-ooo, who told you that?! The morning is a great time to drink a glass of lovely water! Drinking water is healthy throughout the day. Just don’t go drinking 3 litres of water all at once – at any time of the day. That’s not wise. And you’d need a toilet to be really nearby.

5) I only need to drink when I’m thirsty

Wrong! You should drink water even when you’re not thirsty. Thirst is a physiological alert that the body sends when it has lost a bit too much water. Your body is pretty clever – give it some credit, it’s trying to tell you something.

6) Drinking cold water can make me sick

Really? It honestly shouldn’t. There’s probably something else going on. Maybe try having a chat with your doctor? They know their stuff.

7) Drinking water makes me pee a lot

Yup, that’s your body doing what it’s designed to do – regulate your water balance. You’ll pee out lovely clear, odorless urine if you’re sufficiently hydrated. So that’s a good thing. If your pee is tending towards a darker yellow (or brown!) then your body’s crying out for more water. Diuretics (such as caffeine, arguably) will make you pee even if you don’t really need to. If you’re worried about peeing a lot then the best person to talk to, as ever, is your trusted doctor.

8) I don’t sweat so I don’t need to drink water

Yes you do. Your body constantly loses water to balance its temperature. You might feel superficially comfortable because any sweat is discreetly evaporating, but you’re still losing water that you need to replace.

9) I in an air conditioning place so I don’t need to drink too much

Did you even read the point above!? Even in air-conditioned environments, your body still loses water (it’s sneaky like that) and your skin dries out.

10) Drinking too much water can kill you

Drinking so much water that you die is very, very rare. Water intoxication or water poisoning can only happen when you drink absolutely excessive amounts of water – way too much than your normally self-regulating body can cope with. If you’re heading that way you’ll probably be painfully bloated and you’ll end up vomiting, that’s a pretty good signal that you’ve drunk too much. Hyponatremia occurs when the salt level in your blood becomes way too diluted. Exercise-associated hyponatremia is relatively common in marathon runners when they have not managed their water intake correctly. Listen to your body – it works little miracles every day!

Personal Trainer | Fitness Guru
www.kellyfennelly.com

about

Kelly Fennelly

I have been a professional in the fitness industry for more than 20 years. A native of the PNW, I have lived in Seattle for 16+ years. I spend most of my time designing and implementing Wellness Programs for clients. Along with my passion for Wellness & Fitness, I have a passion for supporting local non-profits and contributing to our community. 7 years ago I started a not for profit charity called Little Black Dress Party and hold annual fundraising events for local nonprofits focused on women, children, and families.

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